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Journal Guidelines

Below are the journal assignments. The due dates for the following questions appear on the class syllabus. Be sure to read this page in full before doing your first journal entry. Take note of the citation requirement and the grading rubric at the bottom of the page.

Journal Questions:

REMINDER: For all journal assignments above, be sure to cite both sources from our text and the articles/internet resources/periodicals/magazines that you use. Click here to learn how to format citations.


Using Scholarly Sources:

Scholarly sources are generally identified as periodicals, publications, or monographs that are peer-reviewed by other experts in a particular academic field or those issued by university presses. For two good sources on identifying scholarly sources, please see the following;

  1. Scholarly versus Non-scholarly sources (St. Charles Community College): a checklist guide for identifying scholarly works.
  2. Distinguishing Scholarly Journals from Other Periodicals (Cornell University Library): guidance on identifying scholarly sources.
  3. Search using Google Scholar: Please note that these searches may not yield periodicals or texts to which you have full access. As always this is a starting place and should always be cross-referenced with the AIP Library Link below because our databases offer you full text access to many of the journal articles you locate through ProQuest or Wilson Web.
  4. AIP Library Link: A connection to the scholarly databases available at AIP's Library. The best databases for our class are ProQuest and Wilson Web. Be sure to stop by the library to pick up a guide to the database usernames and passwords so that you can log on from the comfort of home.

A Word about Wikipedia & other Internet based sources:

Though Wikipedia can provide a great starting place for understanding an idea and locating good links with additional information, it is NOT CONSIDERED A SCHOLARLY SOURCE AND SHOULD NOT BE USED IN YOUR JOURNAL ENTRIES AS A SCHOLARLY SOURCE. Many internet sources do not qualify as scholarly sources because they are not authored, peer-reviewed or sponsored by a reputable research source.

Please use good discretion in evaluating information before you include it in your journal entries. The research librarians who work in our 3rd floor library can be a great resource if you are new to scholarly research. Please do not hesitate to ask for their assistance in searching the library's databases as they will teach you how to perform research searches effectively and efficiently which will save you tons of time in completing assignments.

The AIP Writing Center is also a great place to go for help in getting started with journal assignments. Click here to make an appointment to visit the writing center.


Journal Formatting Requirements:

Throughout the class we will be considering theoretical and applied approaches to ethics. To help you incorporate your study of ethics into your experience at AIP, we’ll be doing journals covering each topic listed above. You must turn in at least 2 quality journal entries on their due date to receive a passing journal grade.  

One of the requirements for receiving a good grade is a willingness to explore your ideas. Take some time and think about what you are going to write before you begin writing. I am not interested in your personal opinions concerning the journal question. Rather you should evaluate your "intuitive" response and rationally integrate it with material from the chapter under consideration.

PURPOSE:

The purpose of doing journal entries is twofold:

  1. It helps you to integrate theoretical material into your everyday understanding of ethics. In so doing, you become better acquainted with your own ethical positions and those of others with whom you must interact (e.g., other students, co-workers, instructors, parents, siblings, etc).
  2. Writing builds language skills and language skills are a critical piece of your education. Studies on job placement and career advancement consistently show that the best communicator is the most likely candidate for lucrative positions/contracts; the best communicator may not necessarily be the best skilled applicant for the position. In short, this means that if you are good at what you do, but not a good communicator, you will be excluded from many opportunities. Individuals who cannot write and speak well are often perceived as functionally illiterate.

FORMAT

  1. FORMAT: All journals must be typed and uploaded on the due date (see our syllabus schedule) @ http://www.turnitin.com/static/index.html. You can upload Word or PDF documents. No handwritten work will be accepted. Your log in information is as follows: class ID: 3718225 enrollment password: wintersnow11
  2. Minimum length for a journal entry to receive a passing grade (D or better) is 2 pages doubled-spaced with 1-inch margins. Font sizes should be 12 point or less. Please use easily readable text fonts. Please note: Just turning in a minimum length paper does not guarantee a passing grade. If you want to earn an A or B your paper should be at least 3 pages but no more than 5 pages.
  3. Your name, class, section, journal assignment, and date should appear on one line at the top line of the page.
  4. WHEN ARE ENTRIES DUE? Journals are due at the beginning of class on Wednesday of weeks 2, 3, 4, 6, 7. and 8. The time of your submissions will be catalogued by Turnitin.com’s site.
  5. HOW MANY JOURNAL ENTRIES MUST YOU DO? You must turn in two journal entries on time and receive a passing grade on them (70% or better) to earn a passing grade for the journal portion of the course. You have six opportunities to get journal entries in on time so no excuse will be accepted for late entries.
  6. Late journal assignments: No late journal entries will be accepted. If you know that you will not be in class, upload your entry early on/before the day it is due. Journal assignments not turned in will receive zero credit and negatively affect your final grade.
  7. Extra Credit Journal Entries: You may not do journal entries for extra credit in this course.
  8. Grammar, punctuation and usage count. You are responsible for proofreading your entries before you turn in them in. Journals that contain multiple mechanical writing errors (3 or more) will not receive a passing grade.
  9. The quality of your journal entries matters. When grading your entries, I must be able to see that you have read the assignment in your critique and that your entry is relevant to the reading. You should cite the theorist you are discussing and use textual examples from the reading or lecture to support your claims. Please see the attached journal grading rubric for guidelines on grading criteria.
  10. Plagiarism notice: If you quote/paraphrase the author’s ideas, or my lecture, you should include the source’s name in parenthesis after the sentence where the material appears.
  11. All journal entries will be checked for plagiarism using TurnItIn.com’s web site. If your entry consists of material largely copied from web sites, (i.e., more than 25%) it will receive a failing grade.
  12. In order to avoid plagiarism, make sure you are using small (i.e., 1 or 2 sentence quotes). Do not copy entire paragraphs as quotes; summarize them in your own words and cite the source parenthetically immediately after the sentences that summarize the material and be sure to list the source in your bibliography.
  13. Instructions for doing citations appear on the journal guidelines page (on the class web site). Journals without proper citations will receive a failing grade.
  14. Students who copy or turn in work from:
    1. another’s student’s entry (present or past quarters), or
    2. information bought/copied from the Internet

will receive a failing grade for the course and face disciplinary policies outlined under plagiarism in the AIP student handbook.

  1. In addition to having proper citations within the text of your entry, all journal entries must contain a bibliography (i.e., works cited page) that lists all sources (including the class text) that were used within the entry. Formats for bibliography entries for our class notes, internet resources and text appear on the journal page of our class web site. You must tailor the examples to fit your particular needs. Journals that do not include complete bibliographies, or include incorrectly formatted bibliographies, will not receive a passing grade. If you are having trouble generating the proper format for your bibliography visit www.easybib.com for help with MLA formatted bibliographies.
  2. If you receive a failing grade on a journal entry for any reason, there will be no opportunity to make it up or do extra credit.

Entries that do not meet the above requirements will not receive a grade and will be returned. For those students who do not have home computers or adequate word processing programs, AIP labs are equipped with Internet access and Microsoft Office.


Citing Sources:

You are responsible for citing sources in you journal each time you either summarize or quote the ideas of another author. The author's name, not editor's, is used in all citations below. Here are three examples taken from our course:

Example #1 Citing an Internet web site or source found on the Internet:
Example #2 Citing works from our class text, Today's Moral Issues; format = (author, pg #)
Example #3 Citing works from our class lectures.
Example #4 Citing works from scholarly journals/periodicals.

Doing a bibliography:

Every research paper should include a bibliography page; some instructors call this a "Works Cited" page, but the content is the same. Note that a bibliography is quite different from a citation and both should appear in your paper. If you are having trouble generating the proper format for your bibliography visit www.easybib.com for help with MLA formatted bibliographies.

Here are three of the most common bibliographical entries you will use in our course.

Example #1 Internet web site or source found on the Internet:
Example #2 Bibliography for our class text, Today's Moral Issues: Classic and Contemporary Perspectives
Example #3 Bibliography for class lectures
Example #4 Bibliography for scholarly source within a journal/periodical:

 


Grading Rubric:

The table below summarize my method for evaluating your journals. When you read the table, it should be easy for you to see the criteria necessary for receiving various letter grades.

 
A:
  • Exceeds minimum requirement for length
  • Content includes references and quotes to the material covered in the readings
  • At least one primary source (e.g., assigned reading) and one secondary source (i.e., scholarly sources in philosophy) are present.
  • Material summarized or quoted from a primary or secondary source is cited.
  • Student actively interprets material and devises original aesthetic theories by synthesizing the new material with personal views.
  • Student creatively introduces nuances/various possibilities for answering the journal question at hand.
  • Student makes additional references to contemporary situations taken from current events and applies reading material to these situations.
  • No grammar, punctuation, usage or spelling errors
B:
  • Exceeds minimum requirement for length
  • Content includes references and quotes to the material covered in the readings
  • At least one primary source (e.g., assigned reading) and one secondary source (i.e., scholarly sources in philosophy) are present.
  • Material summarized or quoted from a primary or secondary source is cited.
  • Student actively interprets material and devises original aesthetic theories by synthesizing the new material with personal views.
  • Less than three (3) grammar, punctuation, usage or spelling errors
C:
  • Meets minimum requirement for length
  • Primary source is present but no secondary source is used/identified.
  • Content includes references to the material covered in the readings
  • Material summarized or quoted from a primary or secondary source is cited.
  • Less than three (3) grammar, punctuation, usage or spelling errors
D:
  • Barely meets minimum requirements
  • Content does not reference readings or use quotes to support student's position
  • No citations or quotes
  • At least three (3) grammar, punctuation, usage or spelling errors
F:
  • Does not meet minimum requirements
  • More than five (5) grammar, punctuation, usage or spelling errors
 

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